When a Great Philippine Eagle looks you in the eye, it’s breathtaking. When that crest flares up and those riveting blue eyes connect with yours, there is no question that this is a magnificent bird we must save from extinction.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has produced a stunning new film, Bird of Prey, which tells the dramatic story of the Great Philippine Eagle. Films about nature are evolving to present unique views in stunning detail, advances in equipment and techniques immerse viewers in the world of wildlife like never before. This beautifully rendered story removes the distance we often feel for nature and this empowers us to consider our role as guardians differently.

If you enjoyed this preview of Bird of Prey, please consider supporting the Lab’s multimedia initiatives and other critical work today!

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Human culture has always reflected a strong observation of ritual, today the definition has broadened from spiritual and community expressions to encompass practices of success and performance. In this behind the scenes series ‘RITUALS” by HANAH, a lifestyle supplement brand, we shadow world-renowned climber, mountaineer, skier, filmmaker and photographer, Jimmy Chin as he goes about his morning ‘ritual’.

HANAH maintains ancient medical traditions and adapts them into products for modern living. The company is committed to locating and harvesting the highest quality natural ingredients and manufacturing them in a way that preserves their maximum health benefits to deliver noticeable results.

Its first product, HANAH ONE, is an Ayurvedic superfood taken daily to help strengthen the immune system as well as improves focus and mental clarity. Based on 5,000 years of Ayurvedic tradition, ONE contains 30 wild-harvested herbs and botanicals in a base of honey, ghee, and sesame oil. HANAH ONE is an artisanal product that is free of gluten, caffeine, lactose, and GMOs, and is handcrafted in India to create and preserve local traditions, jobs, and the community.

Jimmy Chin leads breakthrough explorations around the globe, working with the best adventurers, climbers, snowboarders and skiers on their most challenging expeditions. As a filmmaker, his documentary “Meru” chronicled the first ascent of Shark’s Fin in the Garwhal Himalayas—winning the prestigious Audience Award at Sundance. He has climbed Everest twice and was one of the first Americans, alongside Kit and Rob Deslauriers, to ski from its summit. Whether on the road or at home, Jimmy incorporates HANAH into his daily routine.

Explore HANNA Life @ hanahlife.com

Hosted by Mitch Stringer, join Art on his many trips around the world—or to his own back yard. With audio recorded on location, gain insight into the concepts and places integral to Art’s workshops, seminars, and other events.

Legendary nature photographer, Art Wolfe, explores the visual highlights of Namibia in this episode of ‘Where’s Art?’. The series of short videos, feature a montage of Art’s latest images and insider location advise—a great primer for scouting locations, planning and inspiring your next photographic adventure!

Over the course of his 40-year career, photographer Art Wolfe has worked on every continent and in hundreds of locations. Wolfe’s photographs are recognized throughout the world for their mastery of color, composition and perspective. Wolfe’s photographic mission is multi-faceted: art, wildlife advocacy, education, and journalism inform his work.

Wolfe is the host of the award-winning television series Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge, an intimate and upbeat series that offers insights on nature, culture, and the realm of digital photography. It now airs worldwide.

Wolfe has released over eighty books, including Earth Is My Witness, The Art of the Photograph, Vanishing Act, Human Canvas, and The Living Wild. His photos have appeared in magazines worldwide, including National Geographic, Smithsonian, Stern, GEO, and Terre Sauvage.

Education is a major component of Wolfe’s work, whether it is about the environment or about photography. He leads photographic tours and gives seminars worldwide.

Along with his numerous book and television awards, Wolfe is the proud recipient of the Nature’s Best Photographer of the Year Award, the North American Nature Photography Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the Photographic Society of America’s Progress Medal. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, a Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers

Wolfe maintains his online gallery, stock agency, and production company in Seattle, Washington.

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Lume Cube, creator of The World’s Most Versatile Light, brought some of the world’s greatest athletes to Interlaken, Switzerland to step out of their comfort zones and into the night. Watch Jamie O’Brien, Sean “Poopies” McInerney, Austin Keen, Nick Jacobsen, Kalani Chapman, Kaikea Elias and more do some of the most insane adventure sports up in the Swiss Alps, all in the middle of the night with 250 LUME CUBES!

Create by Night @LumeCube, lumecube.com

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Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic have joined forces to further inspire the world through expedition travel. Their collaboration in exploration, research, technology and conservation will provide extraordinary travel experiences and disseminate geographic knowledge around the globe.

People seek exploration in wild places to experience adventure, to contribute to science and conservation, to encounter native wildlife and cultures—Lindblad and National Geographic connect travellers to all this and much more.

Discover the world @ expeditions.com

Beautifully melodic, the dulcet tones of pop artist Miley Cyrus adds emotional urgency to a new campaign by Pacific Wild. #SAVEBCBEARS is a socially empowered initiative to draw attention to a government loophole being exploited by hunters in British Columbia, where bears are being hunted for food under a law that technically only bans trophy hunting.

The initiative’s centrepiece is an online video featuring Miley Cyrus performing a rendition of Teddy Bears’ Picnic against the backdrop of an empty wilderness. Head to savebcbears.org to listen to Miley’s new acoustic cover as she joins the efforts of Pacific Wild to work towards the protection of one of the most iconic, intelligent, slowest-reproducing land mammals in British Columbia.

You would rightly presume the presence of bears in a land known for them, would be fiercely protected by the powers that be—yet bears, an essential element of the ecosystem, need public outrage and support to enforce stricter laws for their preservation.

On August 14th, the NDP government announced a ban on the grizzly bear trophy hunt province-wide and a stop to all hunting of grizzlies in the Great Bear Rainforest—after the fall hunt, which began the day after the announcement. This year, the Fall hunt has been extended from August 15 to November 30, 2017.

In the fall hunt female grizzlies may be pregnant when they are hunted. In the spring hunt, female bears are often shot due to mistaken identity leaving their cubs to perish. Grizzly bears have the second lowest reproduction rate of North American land mammals. Economically, BC’s grizzly bear trophy hunt threatens the growing and sustainable wildlife-based tourism industry. Eco-tourism and bear viewing attract thousands of people to BC every year and create sustainable employment. There is simply no scientific, ethical or economic rationale for the hunt.

The changes by the NDP government still allow for the killing of grizzlies in the rest of the province so long as hunters take the bear’s edible portions. This does not make for a true end to trophy hunting; it is a loophole that may lead to more poaching for valuable trophies, and it is unclear how it will be enforced. Grizzly bear meat is rarely eaten by hunters. Even if the meat must be checked by a Conservation Officer, it could still be discarded afterwards. We do not oppose hunting for food, but one of the most powerful, intelligent, slowest-reproducing, and farthest ranging land mammals is not a necessary or ethical food source.

British Columbia is one of the last refuges of the grizzly bear, which once roamed widely across North America. Despite widespread opposition, our government continues to treat this vulnerable and iconic species as an expendable resource.

Your voice matters. Miley Cyrus is working with Pacific Wild to advocate for the long-term survival of grizzly bears. Join us today in the #SAVEBCBEARS movement, alongside 90% of British Columbians, including Coastal First Nations, who wish to see an end to this barbaric hunt. Make your own version of our campaign video and sign the petition.

During last year’s UK National Whale and Dolphin Watch, a record-breaking 1,529 hours of dedicated watches took place. Some 300 hours more than any previous occasion, this represents 2,500 volunteers all around the British Isles getting involved to report on the UK’s whale and dolphin species.

2017 was the sixteenth year that this huge citizen science scheme had taken place and clearly the event is building on popularity year on year. “It’s so important for people to join in helping us to track whales, dolphins and porpoises in UK waters. The Sea Watch Foundation database holds hundreds of thousands of records which are used by scientists and governments to inform research and policy on these wonderful animals” says Kathy James, Sightings Officer for Sea Watch. “By taking part, people are directly contributing to their conservation”.

Aside from the expansive effort put in by volunteers in 2017, there were also a huge number of whale, dolphin and porpoise sightings reported as part of the event. 1,410 records of cetaceans, the collective term for whales, dolphins and porpoises, were reported from land and at sea.

“The wonderful thing about watching for whales and dolphins in the UK is that you don’t necessarily have to get on a boat to see them” adds Kathy.

More than half of the reports received came from land-based volunteers stationed at one of 108 survey sites or those who were lucky enough to spot a cetacean as they went about their other business. Forty-eight vessels were also involved with the event, from pleasure craft and fishing vessels to ferries and cruise ships.

The reports received during the 2017 National Whale and Dolphin Watch amounted to around 6,500 individual animals “captured” by the survey, a powerful testament to citizen science.

This most recent effort also showed that on average around the UK, a cetacean could be spotted once an hour! North and East Scotland, South Devon, Cornwall and North-east England all had a greater sightings rate than the national average. These excellent cetacean-spotting areas clocked up between 1 and 5 animals per hour on average per site.

Eleven different cetacean species were seen in UK waters during the National Whale and Dolphin Watch. All in all, 29 species of cetacean have been recorded in UK waters although only fourteen are recorded regularly. Seeing a good proportion of these in just nine days goes to show what people can achieve when they work together.

Sea Watch Foundation are seeking volunteers to come forward to take part in the National Whale and Dolphin Watch 2018 this summer, which takes place 28th July – 5th August. Surveys can take place from your favourite or closest bit of coastline and boat-users are urged to get in touch too. No experience is necessary as the team at Sea Watch will offer you training and advice on how to take part.

Find out more about the event: seawatchfoundation.org.uk

Whilst UK gears up for their annual watch, Jonas Liebschner, a photographer and guide with Whale Watching Sydney, releases ‘Whales of Sydney: and other visitors to our shores’. The book due out in March 2018, beautifully documents the annual migration of whales past the coast of Sydney through engaging photography. Their behaviors and the interaction between them have changed our understanding of the whale’s importance and the need to protect them for future generations.

New Holland Publishers, ISBN: 9781925546132

To ensure a prosperous career in a climate of lightening innovation and constant evolution, gain a vital edge with smart forecasting and insider knowledge.

It’s hard to ignore the tide of technological advancement and its diverse applications in today’s world, and our dependance and integration of these breakthroughs is unlikely to fade in the future.

The zeitgeist of our time is driven by a movement towards intelligent technologies and so the wise who seek meaningful, expansive, and challenging roles in this future might well look at engineering as a smart career choice.

We asked leading career coach, Ray Pavri, to interpret the multi-dimensional value of engineering as a catalyst profession for conservation, science, medicine and more…

Engineers can transform the world into a better place and maintain the world to stay as a better place.

Both have relevance, but is engineering a smart career choice in 2018 and beyond?

Yes, but you must think beyond the stereotypical applications of engineering in traditional industries like mining, oil and gas, coal fired power generation and manufacturing. You’ve got to shift your attention to growing industries such as the environment including air, food & water quality and health. Engineering for an ageing population, urban infrastructure related engineering to cope with growing cities, engineering within defence within what is an ever-changing international climate and agriculture related technology innovation enforcing Australia as the food bowl of Asia. This is where the future will be, for a lot of young engineers.

Irrespective of whether it’s transforming or maintaining type of work as an engineer, if you embark on your engineering career with a genuine love of what you are doing alongside creativity, initiative, business acumen, communication skills and connectedness with others, you will do well.

A lot of engineers facing frustrations in the mid to late stages of their life have lost sight of what makes them happy, being chained to lifestyles rather than de-linking, re-calibrating and re-engaging in areas which they’d get joy out of. It is hard to make the world a better place and through that get true joy in being an engineer, if your own head space does not get better.

Take the example of Professor Ana Deletic, a one of Australia’s innovative engineers for 2017. She created a technology called “green-blue walls” for installation as small planter boxes on walls, taking up entire walls of multi-story buildings, with gravity and plant roots doing the job of percolating greywater and stormwater within urbanised areas. The phosphorus concentrations being extracted also reduce local temperatures, increase biodiversity and the amenity value of urban areas. There are many applications of this technology and it will transform the world into a better place.

Other Australian engineers who are enjoying what they are doing and excelling in their own sub-disciplines include:

Tony Lavorato (Complex Cantilevering Over Heritage Structures)
Wes Johnston (Mobile Swing-stage Gantry)
Gregory Kelly (Flooded Roads Smart Warning System)
Dr Madhu Bhaskaran (Stretchable Oxide Electronics)
Simon St Hill (Heat Recovery Power Generator)
Peter Atherton (New Clinical Waste Management)
Dr Richard Kelso (Low Drag Bicycle Helmets)
Professor Sandra Kentish (Storing CO2 in Microalgae)
Dan Copelin (Virtual Pipes)

See a full list of Australia’s Most Innovative Engineers @ innovativeengineers.com.au

So how can you set yourself apart in the world of engineering?

Seek inspiration and reach out to others. Connecting with others is a sure-fire way to improve your career success.

This need not start only when you are in the work force. It should start even while you are at Uni as a group of students at the University of NSW have done. A team of engineering students from the University of NSW, physicists, lawyers, communications specialists and musicians teamed up to design a DNA scaffold that could help find a cure for HIV. This innovation earned the UNSW students the Grand Prize at Harvard’s annual BIOMOD competition.
To connect though, you need a good range of soft skills.

Too often engineers are remaining in silos rather that reaching out to others – after all engineering has day-to-day applications and for that to happen you need to connect with the full fabric of society.

It is also important for engineers to understand market context, relating what they are doing to current and future market needs. There are several engineering related Phd’s who show untapped potential driving Ubers when they could be re-shaping the world – all because of the desire to create the perfect mouse trap which no one wants.

Another imperative to make it in engineering in the modern world is to keep up with societal challenges and that means keeping up with what is in the news both here and globally. It is about keeping an eye out for the “wouldn’t it be nice if” societal needs because inherent within these needs, lie creative engineered solutions which could turn the world on its head. Australian engineers are equally placed as engineers globally to change this world we live in.

The future of engineering as a smart career choice lies in its diverse applications – industrial batteries adjoining intermittent power generation like wind and solar. Or in smart devices proliferating society and work places within the internet of things revolution. Or in driverless cars, driverless trains at mining sites and now driverless cargo ships within the broader automation revolution taking shape.

When you start to think about the application of engineering to the world’s problems, the opportunities seem endless.

Ray Pavri is Australia’s most respected career coach for degree-qualified engineers. A career professional with an MBA in Business, Ray has held senior roles with many large organisations in Australia. But his real passion is working with engineers and technical professionals at all levels of management who are stagnating in their careers.

For the past twenty years, Ray has helped over 4,000 technical professionals escape the work trap dilemma to discover more rewarding and meaningful careers. As founder of Watt Electrical News, a premier online resource within the global electrical community, and My Electrical Community, a peer-to-peer business and social network, Ray is devoted to improving the lives of technical professionals throughout Eastern Australia. Connect with the Career Coach @ jobtransitionstrategy.com

The end of 2017 marked a long overdue victory for the little plant of big controversy.

Australia has been slow to adopt hemp as a food-grade ingredient, banning imports and forcing growers to label their products as pet food or skincare. With the lift in policy our shelves are displaying a more diverse offering of hemp infused foods, from hemp yogurt to artisan breads and beers. The consumer is spoilt for choice as imports compete for shelf space alongside homegrown hemp, and here is where we have a chance to support local growers in an emerging industry.

We asked artisan producers Australian Primary Hemp to give perspective on the potential expansion of hemp products and the difference of locally sourced hemp.

Since the legalisation of Hemp as a food in Australia on the 12th of November last year, we have seen the market inundated with new Hemp food products hitting the shelves. At Australian Primary Hemp our retail line includes a Hemp Oil, Hemp Protein, and Hulled Hemp Seeds. Other interesting food products popping up around Australia include Hemp Beer, Hemp Granola, Hemp Milk, Hemp Butter and even Hemp Ice-cream. The wider Hemp market has also flourished introducing a range of hemp clothing, concrete, paper and plastic products to the market.

The Hemp seeds used to produce different consumables can be sourced locally here in Australia and internationally from places like China and Canada. At Australian Primary Hemp we are passionate about supporting local farmers and watching this emerging agricultural industry grow. This is why we source all our seeds directly from the farmer we work with locally around Australia. By doing this we can ensure the quality of the seed, how it has been produced and that it is 100% Australian.

The risk with buying Hemp food products that use internationally imported seed is that you can’t guarantee the seed is fresh, what conditions it has been grown in and where it has come from.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, why not add a new food experience to your romantic plans. Our Vegan Hemp Pesto creates a beautiful vibrant green colour, goes perfectly with crackers or bread and is simple and quick to make. Perfect for a picnic under the stars or for recreating your own ‘Lady and the Tramp’ pasta moment!

Ingredients

2 cups of fresh basil
1/2 cup of fresh spinach leaves
1 garlic clove
1 cup Hemp Oil
Juice of half a lemon
1/4 hemp seeds
1 tablespoon of Hemp Protein
Pinch of salt

Instructions

Place all ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth. Serve with fresh bread, crackers or with pasta.

Dine Differently with AU Hemp @ ausprimaryhemp.com.au

New Year Resolutions are a loaded list of short-fuse goals, the spark ignites a vision of health and success but life and habits happen! This annual ritual of set-then-forget is an interesting psychological phenomena which has inspired countless books and articles. Various theories point the finger of failure at one or more of the following,

Motivation: a goal must inspire you on a authentic and visceral level.

Habit: consistency is required to break a habit and it helps to replace undesirable triggers with positive reinforcement ‘rewards and rituals’.

Time: goals need to be realistic and measurable, set the clock back 5-10 minutes instead of an hour to begin with and adapt your schedule in increments. Be flexible and free-style your day to make use of idle moments or suitable spaces ‘office yoga’ anyone? Track time spent on a given goal, frame this metric as you please (minutes, hours, days) and it could reflect how long you have abstained from something also (e.g. not buying the latest fashion).

The sum of this trio is simple: how we frame and plan our approach to achieving goals, will influence the success of our outcome.

Now I’d like to explore two popular resolutions which, have found a way to reinvigorate a superficial goal with a substantive motive.

Fitness is a best-seller come January, who doesn’t desire more energy, strength, and a few less pounds?

What if fitness was a healthy result of a humanitarian mission?

It’s crazy to think that 844 million people in the world—one in ten—do not have clean water¹. It’s something so simple that we don’t think about. Every minute a newborn dies from an infection caused by lack of safe water and an unclean environment. When you put it like that, it’s even harder to understand why mainstream media isn’t tackling the issue head-on. The facts are, if every person on earth had access to clean water, the number of deaths caused by diarrhoea would be cut by a third.

Clubbercise, a UK founded company changing the game in the fitness industry by combining fitness and clubbing in one fun, easy-to-follow workout, is hoping to make a change. Litres of water are consumed at every Clubbercise dance fitness class to keep participants (aka Clubbers) stay hydrated—this luxury isn’t afforded to everyone.

It all started when Claire Burlison Green and her friends were discussing that there weren’t any dance fitness classes that played the kind of music enjoyed in clubs on a night out. Always looking for a creative way to keep fit, Claire and her friends started putting together routines and playlists. Their ‘healthy clubbing’ classes started in mid-2013 and in 2014, Clubbercise training officially launched in the UK.

Clubbercise rapidly became wildly popular and within three years over 2,000 instructors from gyms, health clubs and dance studios were trained. Today there are over 100,000 people who regularly participate in Clubbercise sessions. In 2016 Clubbercise was introduced to Virgin Active clubs in Thailand and Singapore.

With their rapid growth, Claire Burlison Green made it her mission contribute to making water safe and accessible for everyone. Inspired by the American brand TOMS Shoes, Claire loved the idea of buying something and giving to charity at the same time. When she started Clubbercise, it seemed natural to make the water connection with people coming to classes and taking it for granted that they could fill up their water bottle and drink as much as they needed to stay hydrated.

A donation to Oxfam is made whenever someone becomes a licensed Clubbercise instructor. The money donated to Oxfam is used to set up and maintain safe water supply with pumps, tanks or purification systems. With every donation, roughly 10 people gain access to safe drinking water in some of the poorest places on the planet. With over 2,000 instructors trained internationally, Clubbercise has provided thousands of people something that could mean the difference between life and death.

Clubbercise classes will be sweeping the nation in 2018, training more instructors and providing more people with clean water.

Get Fit for a Cause @ clubbercise.com/australia

¹ https://www.wateraid.org/au/why-wateraid/facts-and-statistics

Next let’s challenge our perception of Fashion. Often part of a New Year’s Resolve to curb a spending spree or shake-up a tired wardrobe?

What if fashion was a stylish result of a globally empowering aim?

Project Futures, an Australian not-for-profit whose purpose is to educate the public about human trafficking and slavery issues, has collaborated with fashion designer Steven Khalil to launch its very first charity t-shirt. The aim is to raise awareness of crimes that deprive women and children of their freedom and dignity in Australia and abroad. With over 45.8 million people enslaved, modern slavery is the fastest-growing crime industry in the world today.

Renowned red carpet and bridal gown Australian designer Steven Khalil has dressed the likes of Beyoncé, Jennifer Lopez and Nicole Kidman. Casual lifestyle brand Citizen Wolf, who believe in producing ethical, local and sustainable clothes, has also teamed up to create the organic charity t-shirts. In partnership, both Steven Khalil and Citizen Wolf represent the Australian fashion industry as the faces of a better future. Zoe Marshall, Australian media personality, wife of NRL star Benji Marshall, and soon-to-be mother, is one of the celebrity ambassadors who is giving her full support for this project.

100% of the profit goes directly to helping end modern slavery and cover a range of services from medical treatment to psychological service.

The exclusive Steven Khalil charity tee retails for $99 from projectfutures.com.

Khalil and Wolfe talk with BE Journal about the Future of Fashion get it in your inbox!

Science has shrugged off it’s serpentine grasp of academic rigour and embraced a simpler language—speaking to a new generation with interactive, DIY science experiments. Now we have Popular Science, an official category covering a genre that includes all fields of scientific investigation: neuroscience, bioscience, astrophysics, robotics…with more emerging variants trending at lightening pace. Today, the formerly impenetrable lofts of science are reimagined as Youtube videos, sci-fi talkshows, interactive museums and theme parks. This opens avenues to create new career paths into science, welcoming more diverse methods of exploration which can shape how we learn and engage with science.

Self-made science guy, Jacob Strickling, shares his unconventional career path and the experiments which make science fun!

I love Science… Always have!

Exploring how things work, marvelling at the creation around me. Intrigued and blown away by the bombardier beetle and the firefly. I just had to be a science teacher and so pursued this career path and satisfied my cravings for how things work by taking the engineering pathway.

I love building things, especially equipment that helps explain scientific principles. Fun stuff as well, rides and games with a science twist. Four years ago, I started filming and uploading myself doing science and building my projects. Make Science Fun was born, so named to remind me and others, that science should be enjoyable and engaging.

A big break happened one year into the life of the YouTube channel. I was off to Japan with some students for a science competition and we had to produce a video about where we live. Whale watching is a regular past time of mine, and so to help film them from my boat and bring them a little closer, I made a device to ‘talk’ to the whales. Surprisingly we soon had whales swimming all around us and the video was pretty exciting. A video distribution company made contact with me and since then I’ve sold hundreds of videos world wide. One of the video’s went seriously viral on FaceBook (we’re talking 50 million views). A TV producer saw the video and made contact, so I ended up doing fun science experiments on the morning news.

A book publisher saw me on TV and so, I wrote my first book ‘Make Science Fun’. It’s filled with childhood memories of the science projects and adventures I got up-to as a kid. One of the nature memories I’ve captured in the book is hunting antlions. When I was young I would catch ants and drop them into the sandy pit-trap of a hungry antlion, watching the hunter catch its prey was always exciting to a 6yr old.

It’s been a privilege being able to help parents have the confidence to do science with their children at home. ‘Make Science Fun’ the book has gone so well it’s even been translated into a Chinese edition.To cater for the next age group up I’ve written a second book ‘Make Science Fun Experiments’. Released early December 2017, its aim is to help young people, ages 8 -15, to do real science experiments at home, following the scientific method.

My favourite project… A DIY Sewage System!

15 years ago my family was fortunate enough to move onto a beautiful property on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Like my neighbouring properties, our sewage was ‘treated’ by a pretty basic septic system. This was fine during sunny weather, but when it rained, the smelly, soapy overflow ran pretty much straight into the local creek which was a vital habitat for frogs, eels, small fish and plenty of other critters. I felt terrible polluting the beautiful environment like I was. At the time, I couldn’t afford the $15,000 for a new aerated waste water treated system which would have guaranteed complete sewage treatment.

Through some research, innovation and (might I say) a stroke of genius, I came up with a design for a home-made sewage system which would only cost $1,200 and perform the same function. The system is based on 7 Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBC’s)—these are 1 metre cubed plastic tanks, inside a metal cage. They are used to import detergents into the country and become a waste product themselves and so can be purchased for incredibly low prices ($100 each).

With the IBC’s, a series of pipes, air diffusers and a blower it only took me a day to build, and the system has been working wonderfully for the past 15 years. In fact, I’ve done some YouTube videos on it, and I’m proud to say that the system has been built many times over in many different countries by like minded people who want to minimise their impact on the local environment.

Make Science Fun Experiments, New Holland Publishers RRP $19.99 available from all good bookstores or online newhollandpublishers.com

Jacob Strickling YouTuber and school Science Co-ordinator, has a passion for making science education fun, relevant and accessible via his You Tube channel Make Science Fun. With regular appearances on the Today Show, he uses science to entertain and inspire people of all ages but specifically children from ages 5–15.