What if you could Save Lives with your Fitness and Fashion Goals?

by Inga Yandell

New Year Resolutions are a loaded list of short-fuse goals, the spark ignites a vision of health and success but life and habits happen! This annual ritual of set-then-forget is an interesting psychological phenomena which has inspired countless books and articles. Various theories point the finger of failure at one or more of the following,

Motivation: a goal must inspire you on a authentic and visceral level.

Habit: consistency is required to break a habit and it helps to replace undesirable triggers with positive reinforcement ‘rewards and rituals’.

Time: goals need to be realistic and measurable, set the clock back 5-10 minutes instead of an hour to begin with and adapt your schedule in increments. Be flexible and free-style your day to make use of idle moments or suitable spaces ‘office yoga’ anyone? Track time spent on a given goal, frame this metric as you please (minutes, hours, days) and it could reflect how long you have abstained from something also (e.g. not buying the latest fashion).

The sum of this trio is simple: how we frame and plan our approach to achieving goals, will influence the success of our outcome.

Now I’d like to explore two popular resolutions which, have found a way to reinvigorate a superficial goal with a substantive motive.

Fitness is a best-seller come January, who doesn’t desire more energy, strength, and a few less pounds?

What if fitness was a healthy result of a humanitarian mission?

It’s crazy to think that 844 million people in the world—one in ten—do not have clean water¹. It’s something so simple that we don’t think about. Every minute a newborn dies from an infection caused by lack of safe water and an unclean environment. When you put it like that, it’s even harder to understand why mainstream media isn’t tackling the issue head-on. The facts are, if every person on earth had access to clean water, the number of deaths caused by diarrhoea would be cut by a third.

Clubbercise, a UK founded company changing the game in the fitness industry by combining fitness and clubbing in one fun, easy-to-follow workout, is hoping to make a change. Litres of water are consumed at every Clubbercise dance fitness class to keep participants (aka Clubbers) stay hydrated—this luxury isn’t afforded to everyone.

It all started when Claire Burlison Green and her friends were discussing that there weren’t any dance fitness classes that played the kind of music enjoyed in clubs on a night out. Always looking for a creative way to keep fit, Claire and her friends started putting together routines and playlists. Their ‘healthy clubbing’ classes started in mid-2013 and in 2014, Clubbercise training officially launched in the UK.

Clubbercise rapidly became wildly popular and within three years over 2,000 instructors from gyms, health clubs and dance studios were trained. Today there are over 100,000 people who regularly participate in Clubbercise sessions. In 2016 Clubbercise was introduced to Virgin Active clubs in Thailand and Singapore.

With their rapid growth, Claire Burlison Green made it her mission contribute to making water safe and accessible for everyone. Inspired by the American brand TOMS Shoes, Claire loved the idea of buying something and giving to charity at the same time. When she started Clubbercise, it seemed natural to make the water connection with people coming to classes and taking it for granted that they could fill up their water bottle and drink as much as they needed to stay hydrated.

A donation to Oxfam is made whenever someone becomes a licensed Clubbercise instructor. The money donated to Oxfam is used to set up and maintain safe water supply with pumps, tanks or purification systems. With every donation, roughly 10 people gain access to safe drinking water in some of the poorest places on the planet. With over 2,000 instructors trained internationally, Clubbercise has provided thousands of people something that could mean the difference between life and death.

Clubbercise classes will be sweeping the nation in 2018, training more instructors and providing more people with clean water.

Get Fit for a Cause @ clubbercise.com/australia

¹ https://www.wateraid.org/au/why-wateraid/facts-and-statistics

Next let’s challenge our perception of Fashion. Often part of a New Year’s Resolve to curb a spending spree or shake-up a tired wardrobe?

What if fashion was a stylish result of a globally empowering aim?

Project Futures, an Australian not-for-profit whose purpose is to educate the public about human trafficking and slavery issues, has collaborated with fashion designer Steven Khalil to launch its very first charity t-shirt. The aim is to raise awareness of crimes that deprive women and children of their freedom and dignity in Australia and abroad. With over 45.8 million people enslaved, modern slavery is the fastest-growing crime industry in the world today.

Renowned red carpet and bridal gown Australian designer Steven Khalil has dressed the likes of Beyoncé, Jennifer Lopez and Nicole Kidman. Casual lifestyle brand Citizen Wolf, who believe in producing ethical, local and sustainable clothes, has also teamed up to create the organic charity t-shirts. In partnership, both Steven Khalil and Citizen Wolf represent the Australian fashion industry as the faces of a better future. Zoe Marshall, Australian media personality, wife of NRL star Benji Marshall, and soon-to-be mother, is one of the celebrity ambassadors who is giving her full support for this project.

100% of the profit goes directly to helping end modern slavery and cover a range of services from medical treatment to psychological service.

The exclusive Steven Khalil charity tee retails for $99 from projectfutures.com.

Khalil and Wolfe talk with BE Journal about the Future of Fashion get it in your inbox!

The following two tabs change content below.
Inga Yandell
Explorer and photo-journalist, passionate about nature, culture and travel. Combining science and conservation with investigative journalism to provide educational resources and a platform for science exploration.
Visit, View, and Subscribe to Bare Essentials Magazine

Previous post:

Next post: