A Great Mirrorless for Mastering Photography

Planning to sneak a few extra days over Easter? Most of us relish the thought of extending the long-weekend into a ten-day-break. For some, it can be the perfect opportunity to up-skill a hobby—transforming their passion into a promising new career.

Photography is a hobby with wide appeal, it is both universal and unique. The visual language of photography transcends many barriers which other forms of communication cannot and accommodates all interests (landscape, food, culture, wildlife). Best of all, it continues to become more and more accessible—with the entry of Full Frame Mirrorless cameras diminishing intimidating learning curves and making professional quality equipment affordable.

Newly released, the EOS R Full Frame Mirrorless from Canon is a prime example of added value without added bulk or cost. The light and adaptable body can be fitted with an E-Mount adapter expanding the range of lenses to encompass a broader selection of options—wonderful news for DSLR users who have already invested heavily in their kit, this makes transitioning to mirrorless a more attractive proposition.

If becoming a professional photographer is something you’ve dreamt about, the EOS R is solid motivation to get cracking on that new career.

Thank’s to the folks at Canon, I have been given the latest kit on the block (EOS R 25-105mm) for review and fully intend on making use of the ten day break over Easter to explore how intuitive, versatile and enjoyable this Full Frame Mirrorless camera makes learning the art and skill of photography?

UpSkilling Strengths of the EOS R

Canopy Climb: EOS R / 50mm F1.2 L, 1/500, f/2.8, ISO 800
  • Weather and Waiting: All professions have good and bad aspects which come with the job, and when your work involves unpredictable or uncomfortable situations as with outdoor photography—it can test your physical stamina and patience. Take wildlife for example, critters abide their own rules and don’t generally accommodate schedules, optimal composition or other creative direction. For that matter, weather forecasts don’t always reflect the whims of nature which can turn nasty quickly, especially in ecosystems with fickle micro-climates. This can and will lead to soggy stake-outs, no-shows and long days in less than forgiving environments. So, the lighter your kit the better! Whilst the EOS RP (485g body and battery) has the edge over the EOS R (625g body and battery) in weight, the ergonomics of the latter are more comfortable (due to its larger grip). Even with kit lens attached the load is not overly fatiguing—I spent 4 hours in a forest climbing uneven terrain and found my neck, shoulders and forearms were all in decent shape by the end. Also, it is a more robust model, lending nicely to adventurous photographers.
Mountain High: EOS R / 50mm F1.2 L, 1/100, f/2.8, ISO 100
  • Instinct and Intuition: Great photographers make an end shot look effortless, but the truth behind the image usually involves hours or days (sometimes weeks or months and on the odd occasion years) of dedicated and stealth observation. Developing an intimate knowledge of the landscape and its wildlife informs their choice of lens and settings. There are no shortcuts to intuition or insight of this nature, but the learning curve is less imposing with Canon’s Dual Pixel on-sensor autofocus system (said to achieve 5655 AF points). This covers 88 % of the frame horizontally and 100% of the frame vertically. Making it a versatile feature for various contexts by minimising the need to frequently adjust settings to accommodate different scenarios. In conditions where you want to reduce the number of focus points, you can use the four-way-controller (be prepared to invest some time though, as there are 65-85 positions to choose from). A better option is to use the touchscreen to touch and drag AF, this also works well when taking group shots where multiple faces are detected but you want to accent only one. A Still subject is optimal for portraits when utilizing eye detect (fidgeters create fuzzy shots). Adaption to low light is remarkable in S-AF, enabling you to capture images like a pro. At distance and when using a longer lens, C-AF also fairs well (although at shallower depths of field the tracking is less consistent). So, if you are shooting outdoors in AF, a sudden overcast shouldn’t be a problem but a gust of wind could result in a blurry image (especially at close range). A manual approach is more often required for adjusting the exposure, as the evaluative metering favours brightness to the focus area. This means two images taken moments apart with the same composition may vary in exposure dramatically, as a result of this behaviour.
Hobbit Hollow: EOS R / 50mm F1.2 L, 1/100, f/2.8, ISO 160
  • Functionality and Fun: Photography should remain a passion even when it becomes a profession, but if technology complicates the creative process some of that joy is inevitably lost. Having a camera that is both functional (thoughtfully designed with accessible features) and fun (making advanced techniques easy to adopt) will help you hold on to that passion as you develop your professional skills. The EOS R has a top LCD Panel to register at a glance your settings, easy access to your memory card, a bigger battery than the EOS RP (up to 350+ shots per charge), max frame rate 4K/29.97p, two options for AF selection (rear touch LCD and four-way controller), a very flexible silent mode (great for wildlife), AF tracking 5FPS, Full Frame Sensor (modelled after 5D Mk IV), 30MP resolution… these are but a few of the features which make the EOS R a great mirrorless option for those wanting to enjoy the process of mastering the art and skill of a photography.
Ant Party: EOS R / 50mm F1.2 L, 1/100, f/2.8, ISO 200
Dusk Rose: EOS R / 24-105mm F4 L, 1/250, f/5.6, ISO 500

Mirrorless Muse: Themes To Explore Over Easter

  • Earth Day (22nd April) enjoy the tiny treasures hidden in your garden, take a trip to a wildlife sanctuary or nature reserve.
  • Anzac Day (25th April), observe the reverence across generations.
Next Generation: EOS R / 50mm F1.2 L, 1/200, f/4.0, ISO 100
  • Visit a chocolatier, capturing the artisan craft. If you live in Melbourne checkout: chocoholictours.com.au
  • Join the hunt for Easter eggs, celebrating the wonder of children, the patterns and colours of artfully decorated eggs.
  • Customs, crafts, cathedrals, feasts and family, are but a few themes to hone your eye and develop your skill in the art of photography.

Resources

Download the Brochure

Body Only RRP: $ 3,099 AU (Shop Online)

Kyōyū – it’s Japanese for share. Kyoyu is an Australian camera sharing community brought together by Canon. It lets you rent out your Canon camera gear or hire the gear you need, quickly and easily.

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Inga Yandell
Explorer and photo-journalist, passionate about nature, culture and travel. Combining science and conservation with investigative journalism to provide educational resources and a platform for science exploration.
Inga Yandell

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